Which model can predict how COVID-19 will progress?

Which model can predict how COVID-19 will progress?

How can you predict which COVID-19 patients will become seriously ill? And what are the chances of survival in patients who have been admitted to the ICU? From the beginning of the pandemic, doctors have been trying to find answers to these kinds of questions. Prediction models can help with this. But which model works well? Statistician Laure Wynants (Care and Public Health Research Institute CAPHRI), together with a team of forty researchers from the Netherlands and abroad, started a living review to review and appraise all published papers on this topic. She was awarded the Edmond Hustinx Prize 2020, that goes to a Maastricht researcher every year, for her work.

Setback after setback, but it’s all part of the process

Setback after setback, but it’s all part of the process

Chic conferences, polished presentations and glossy journals. The scientific world seems like one big success story. “Seems”, because reality, of course, is different. In this series, Observant will look for the mistakes, the setbacks, the slip-ups, the unexpected turns. Because those too, or maybe even especially, are science. Today: Marcel Merk, professor of particle physics.

High blood pressure: three billion 'patients' but little is known about the causes

High blood pressure: three billion 'patients' but little is known about the causes

​High blood pressure is an unseen killer that paves the way to practically all cardiovascular diseases. Yet, very little is known about the cause. Since recently, Maastricht University and MUMC have been carrying out international research with fourteen other centres.

Study put on hold after bankruptcy mental healthcare facility

Study put on hold after bankruptcy mental healthcare facility

Chic conferences, polished presentations and glossy journals. The scientific world seems like one big success story. “Seems”, because reality, of course, is different. In this series, Observant will look for the mistakes, the setbacks, the slip-ups, the unexpected turns. Because those too, or maybe even especially, are science. Today: Anita Jansen, professor of clinical psychology.

“Research must result in something interesting one way or another”

“Research must result in something interesting one way or another”

Chic conferences, polished presentations and glossy journals. The scientific world seems like one big success story. “Seems”, because reality, of course, is different. In this series, Observant will look for the mistakes, the setbacks, the slip-ups, the unexpected turns. Because those too, or maybe even especially, are science. Today: Robert Suurmond, researcher at the School of Business and Economics.

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